PPOHP: The 20th Anniversary Panel

archiving oral history / community-based oral history / gay history / oral history / public humanities / publishing / trans history
Image Description: Flyer of the 20th Anniversary Panel Event Hosted by The ArQuives

Did you know that the Toronto Women’s Bathhouse Committee, the organizing group behind the Pussy Palace events, formed in 1998 to create sex-positive spaces for queer women? Organizer Chanelle Gallant positioned the events as a natural outgrowth of sex-positive queer feminist culture, while Carlyle Jansen highlighted the need for “outreach to queer women’s communities about safer sex.”

Check out what some of the organizers had to say at the 20th anniversary panel event hosted by The ArQuives in September here.

More of The Pussy Palace Oral History Project can be found here.

PPOHP: The Fundraiser

archiving oral history / community-based oral history / gay history / oral history / photography / public humanities / trans history

Did you know that the TWBC hosted a fundraiser to help raise legal fees for the 2 folks charged at the Pussy Palace? Check out this event flyer, donated by Chanelle Gallant. Attendees watched live performances & danced the night away!

Check out the event flyer and buttons, donated by TWBC member Chanelle Gallant.

More of The Pussy Palace Oral History Project here

Catching Up On Queer Public History Reading

archiving oral history / community-based oral history / gay history / oral history / trans history
Image Description: A blueprint of Roanoke On Top of Gregory Samantha Rosenthal’s (they/them or she/her) Selfie!

Inspired by Gregory Samantha Rosenthal’s creative pub crawl for the Southwest Virginia LGBQT2+ History Project! See “Make Roanoke Queer Again” (2017).

The following citation can be used to read more on this piece:
Gregory (Samantha) Rosenthal, “Make Roanoke Queer Again: Community History and Urban Change in a Southern City,” The Public Historian 39, no. 1 (February 1, 2017): 35–60, https://doi.org/10.1525/tph.2017.39.1.35.

More on Gregory Samantha’s Rosenthal’s writing here

Pussy Palace Oral History Project: Gallant’s Box

archiving oral history / community-based oral history / gay history / photography / public humanities / trans history
Image Description: Ephemera from Chanelle Gallant’s Box

Did you know that our search for ephemeral evidence is well underway? We recently received a box full of raid-related artifacts from one of our narrators. We’ve got court transcripts, settlement minutes, Pussy Palace event flyers, and fundraiser buttons (among other amazing things)! We’re excited to spend some time with this stuff. Stay tuned for updates on what we uncover. 

More of The Arquives here
More of The Pussy Palace Oral History Project here
Check out our Twitter and Instagram!

Archivo De La Memoria Trans

archiving oral history / community-based oral history / gay history / oral history / photography / trans history
Image description: un domingo hermoso

“Archivo de la Memoria Trans: el proyecto colaborativo que reunió 10.000 fotos.” The Archivo de la Memoria Trans, translated as The Archive of Trans Memory, has collected over 10,000 photos of Trans Latinx folk. According to La Nacion, the project began as a Facebook group to share old photographs of trans people amongst one another, as a way to honour and commemorate queer and trans people before them. The group allowed people to reconnect with one another, reminisce on fond memories, and inspire one another. Today, the project – widely known as @archivotrans on Instagram – has over 56.000 followers. The project was founded by María Belen Correa with the “objective of the protection, construction, and vindication of Trans Memory” as illustrated in @ArchivoTrans’ biography.

Image description: Tanto lo Anhelé

This archival project showcases the life and dreams of trans Latinx folk from the past. With photographs of trans people living their daily lives or at a party, we see trans people for who they are: humans creating memories with one another. While this may seem mundane at first, the project is unique in that it highlights the lives of trans people, piecing together elements of trans history that are often fragmented. How was Correa able to protect, construct and vindicate trans history all the way back to the 50s?  Correa often posts slides of a particular individual with a brief biography of who they are or once were. The images and stories that this project showcases ultimately humanizes trans people in a world that often reduces the community to their physicality. This is what intrigued me most about this project, as I became privy to the history and stories of trans people that existed outside of their transness. In other words, their whole lives were not only about being trans. They were sisters, siblings, friends, and family members, too.

In the media, transness is often discussed in a cis-influenced perspective, one that reduces trans people to an idealized caricature. However, The Archivo De La Memoria Trans project offers a true narrative by not only celebrating trans existence but, bringing life back into trans identity with the use of photography, anecdotes, and camaraderie. 

Image description: Memoria, Verdad, u Justicia. No al Trans-odio

Trans Activism Oral History Project – Jude Patton

archiving oral history / community-based oral history / gay history / oral history / public humanities / trans history

Jude talks about generational differences in trans communities and activism, his ongoing and extensive work on knowledge gathering and dissemination, and being an early influence on the board of WPATH.

Historical and Geographical Coverage: St. Louis; Sacramento, CA; West Coast USA; 1961-2020

Trans Activism Oral History Project – Presented in Collaboration with the LGBTQ Oral History Digital Collaboratory (project lead, Dr. Elspeth Brown), the Transgender Archives at the University of Victoria, and The ArQuives: Canada’s LGBTQ2+ Archives.

Jude Patton (he/him) interviewed by Dr. Evan Taylor (they/them).
Original recording using Zoom platform on Dec. 19, 2019.

To view a short clip of the interview, click here
To view the full interview, click here

Keywords: Activism; Community; Healthcare; J2CP; Stanford; HBIGDA; WPATH; Family; Information; Trans man

More on The Trans Activism Oral History Project can be found here
More of The ArQuives here


PPOHP: Did You Know?

archiving oral history / community-based oral history / gay history / oral history / public humanities / publishing
Pussy Palace Oral History Project Logo by Claudia Dávila

Did you know that the Pussy Palace Logo was designed by artist Claudia Dávila? Dávila’s playful and sexy graphic features a high-femme kitten in a skin-tight, black, (latex?) jumpsuit sitting poised and ready atop a plush, ruby-red pillow. Meow!

More on the PPOHP can be found here
More of The Arquives here

Trans Activism Oral History Project – Kimberly Nixon

archiving oral history / community-based oral history / gay history / oral history / public humanities / trans history
Image Description: A Photo of Kimberly Nixon and Lawyer Barbara Findlay from The Vancouver Sun

Kimberly talks about her life and work history as a pilot and about her human rights legal cases that she pursued for over 15 years.

Historical and Geographical Coverage: Vancouver, BC, Canada; 1980’s-2020

Trans Activism Oral History Project – Presented in Collaboration with the LGBTQ Oral History Digital Collaboratory (project lead, Dr. Elspeth Brown), the Transgender Archives at the University of Victoria, and The ArQuives: Canada’s LGBTQ2+ Archives.

Kimberly Nixon (she/her) interviewed by Dr. Evan Taylor (they/them).
Original recording using Zoom platform on June 29, 2020.

To view a short clip of the interview, click here
To view the full interview, click here

Keywords: Activism; Legal rights; Law; Human Rights; Anti-oppression; Trans woman; Woman; Female; Rape Relief; Vancouver

More on the Trans Activism Oral History Project can be found here

Call for Applications: Work Study Interview Coder for queer and trans oral histories (LGBTQ Oral History Digital Collaboratory), working with Professor Elspeth Brown.

archiving oral history / gay history / oral history / public humanities / trans history

We seek a work-study eligible graduate student or advanced undergraduate student with experience in interview coding to code LGBQT2+ oral history interviews. The two oral history projects we’re currently working on are the Trans Activism Oral History Project and the Pussy Palace Police Raid Oral History Project. Successful applicants will be contracted from Spring/Summer May 3, 2021 to Aug 6, 2021 (100 hours) at $26.00 per hour.  

This is a work study position. To apply, you must be a University of Toronto student. See https://clnx.utoronto.ca/myAccount/jobs/work-study/aboutws.htm for more eligibility criteria. 

Qualifications: 

· Training in qualitative interview coding 

· Excellent command of various interview transcription coding, and analysis tools such as NVivo; detail-oriented 

· Excellent communication skills 

· Familiarity with intersectional LGBTQ2+ studies preferred 

· Excellent critical thinking, interpersonal, organizational, time management and prioritization skill 

Responsibilities: 

· Review video oral histories and Zoom transcripts 

· Correct transcripts as need be while importing and import videos with the Zoom transcripts into NVivo for analysis 

· Working with the team, develop a workflow for reviewing and coding themes in the interviews 

· Visualize the themes via the software and/or Excel 

· Look for emerging topics/areas of focus for research articles. 

View the job posting for more information:https://clnx.utoronto.ca/myAccount/jobs/work-study/wsjobs.htm  

View the LGBTQ Oral History Digital Collaboratory: http://lgbtqdigitalcollaboratory.org/ 

To apply, email a resume, cover letter and unofficial transcript to CLN; Job#176913 @ https://clnx.utoronto.ca/myAccount/jobs/work-study/wsjobs.htm by May 7, 2021. Questions may be directed to Elspeth Brown, elspeth.brown@utoronto.ca by email.